Category archives for: Cooking T I P S

To avoid sticky rice…

To avoid sticky rice, soak washed rice in water for at least ten minutes before cooking. A teaspoon of oil can be added to get separate grains of cooked rice.

Get rid of the smell of prawns

Apply salt and lemon juice to the prawns before cooking. Leave for 15-20 minutes, then wash off and proceed with the recipe. This is usually done with prawns, fish and al kinds of seafood.

COOKING CHICKEN OR MEAT

When you cook chicken or meat, you should first cook over high heat to seal juices and then lower the heat and cook till tender.

EVEN WITH MEAT

Allow meat to stand at room temperature 1 hour before cooking: It will cook more quickly, brown more evenly, and stick less when pan-fried.

COAT CHICKEN

To coat chicken evenly, you can place the seasonings or crumbs in a plastic bag, and then add a few pieces at a time and shake them well.

Lose weight without dieting

Never skip breakfast Those who think skipping breakfast is a great way to cut calories usually end up eating more throughout the day. Have a bowl of whole-grain cereal with fruits for a quick and nutritious start to your day.     Have an early light dinner Have your dinner as early as you can. […]

If the hot oil starts foaming….

While making any deep fried dish, if the hot oil starts foaming and rises in the pan, add a small piece of tamarind to the oil. This will prevent foaming and spill over.

To thicken any gravy or soup…

To thicken any gravy or soup add corn flour to it. It is an excellent thickening agent. Remember to mix it in good water before adding to avoid lumps.

Don't salt meat before you cook it

The salt forces the juices out and impedes browning. Instead, salt meat halfway through cooking, then taste when the meat is done and adjust the salt as needed.

5 ways to use up leftover fruits, veggies, and more

As much as we try really hard in the EatingWell Test Kitchen to use the entire “thing” when we call for an ingredient (e.g., we like to call for a whole can of broth, an entire vegetable, etc.), sometimes we just can’t. And since I cook at home most nights, often from recipes, I know how annoying and wasteful that can be if I don’t think of a good way to use the leftovers before they go bad. I’ve composted my share of wilted celery bunches, dumped out moldy marinara sauce and forgotten about more than one half-used lemon in the back of my produce drawer. Here are some recipes to help you use up common leftover ingredients so you can eat well and save money.

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